The Realisation of the Absolute
by Swami Krishnananda


Foreword

The Upanishads have always been acknowledged and acclaimed as veritable Mines of Transcendental Wisdom. They are fountain-sources and treasure-houses of Divine Knowledge. But they are something more, too. They also harbour within their precious bosom the key to gain access thereunto. In them we have not only the revelation of the radiant realms of the Supreme Brahman-Consciousness, but also the shining pathway that leads one to it—the secrets of Vedanta-Sadhana or Jnana-Yoga.

In "The Realisation of the Absolute" of Swami Krishnananda, we have a forceful and brilliant monograph on this theme which forms the central core of the Upanishadic texts. He has presented us with a well reasoned-out, clear and illuminating analysis of the problem of the appearance of pluralistic consciousness, and simultaneously given a bold and precise picture of the practical method of shattering this illusion and soaring into the empyrean of the Undifferentiated Absolute-Consciousness, the Reality, the nature of which has been explained by him very elaborately. His treatment of the subject of Vedanta is at once direct, inspiring and compelling, for the statements therein are such as have been tested by the author's own practical personal experience. He is one who is himself living the life of strenuous quest after Truth. Though quite young in age, Swami Krishnananda (whom I know very well indeed) is a seeker of high attainments, full of fiery aspiration and a monk of a very high order. Himself an advanced Sadhaka, nay, a seer-sage in the making, possessing intense renunciation, deep dispassion and keen aspiration, he has indeed rightly emphasised these factors so indispensable to fit one for the path of Jnana-Yoga-Sadhana.

Expositions on pure philosophy there are a good many. Works touching on the broad aspects of Jnana-Yoga, more or less upon the conventional orthodox lines, too, are there. But here you have an erudite consideration of the graduated anatomy of the structure of the practical process through which to realise the FACT about which philosophies but speculate. "The Realisation of the Absolute" is a practical Seeker-Sannyasin's revelation of Jnana and Jnana-Sadhana. It is replete with the sublimest conception of the Vedanta. It is a dazzling light focussed upon the true essence of Vedanta-Sadhana and meditation and valuable hints and clues that reveal the pathway to Self-Realisation. In producing this profound treatise the one supreme urge in the author appears to be to fire the reader with a thirst for the Transcendent Experience of Reality, Brahma-Sakshatkara. I am glad to say that he has succeeded commendably in this purpose. The work is powerful and rousing. One who studies these pages will definitely find himself or herself transformed both in the attitude to life and in aspiration. The sincere reader cannot but feel with the author that "the quest for the Absolute should be undertaken even sacrificing the dearest object, even courting the greatest pain... It is a mistake to be interested in the different forms of perception... Nothing is worth considering except the realisation of Brahman."

I wish this work the reception, acceptance and approbation it richly deserves.

Swami Sivananda
8th September, 1947.